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Thursday, April 06, 2006

A Window of Opportunity

Congress begins a two week recess this coming Monday, and the National Nurse Campaign begins an intense two weeks of lobbying to build momentum for HR 4903, the National Nurse Act of 2006.

Many of you have written you would like to help in this process, but have never met with your US Representative and are unsure how to go about doing this. Here are some easy step by step instructions to follow to help facilitate this and to make your visits successful.

1. First, find out who your Representative is by inserting your zip code. This website will then take you directly to the name, and by clicking on this link, you will find out the location and phone number for the office closest to you.

2. Call the office and say, "I am a constituent of Representative ___ and a supporter of HR 4903, the National Nurse Act of 2006. I would like to make an appointment to meet with Representative ___ within the next two weeks to discuss the bill to determine if Representative ___ will co-sponsor this important piece of legislation."

3. If your Representative is not available, ask for an appointment with the health policy aide. Often a meeting with the health policy aide is even more effective, since healthcare is their area of expertise.

4. After your appointment is confirmed, email teri@nationalnurse.info to receive materials, including talking points and journal editorials.

5. Print these articles in the comfort of your own home.

6. Take these with you to your visit, along with two or three supporters of HR 4903. A small group is very effective, especially if they too are voters in the Representative's district.

7. At the conclusion of the visit, ask if you can count on the Representative co-sponsoring HR 4903. If yes, great, but if unsure, ask when a good time would be to get back to their office staff.

8. Write a thank you and be sure to follow up with any information that might be helpful in answering questions that you weren't completely sure you answered as well as you thought.

9. Pat yourself on the back for a job well done and know you made a difference in helping to move the bill forward.

The National Nursing Network Organization Team—Thursday, April 06, 2006  

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